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How many ways are there to listen to a song?

July 6th, 2008 · 4 Comments

You know when you listen to song, there are some parts of it that you just love? And somehow your senses are just heightened when that part is being played. It’s like you hear everything, even the smallest details, and what kind of instrument they play in the background the kind of sounds they make.

I realized this hidden world of music when I was little. It was Sebastian’s “Kiss the Girl” song from Little Mermaid. At some part of the orchestra, there were some amazing acoustics that made for a truly wonderful effect. I used to rewind and play it over and over and just listen specifically for that part.

It’s too bad I just realized what a wonderful technique this is. Technique for listening to music, I mean. (Maybe if I paid attention to music theory class, I would know this sooner).

Well, today, I’m reminded of the wonderful hidden world of music yet again, by Loreena McKennitt’s song called Snow. She reminds me about everything that is extraordinary in the world of sounds and songs. She should get some kind of amazing award or something, or maybe just boatloads of money from her recordings.

I hope I can see her in concert before I die. Yeah, I will put that on my to do list.


Well, I listened to this song, paying attention only to the harp in the background. The effect is just amazing! It’s like the vocal blends out in the background, and the violin suddenly becomes more prominent, and the harp sometimes so soft you can barely hear it, but it’s still there.

Listening to it this way is like going inside a comfortable cocoon, and be enveloped with such wonderful melodies. With eyes closed and headphones on, and preferably lying down on a bed, this song is enough to make anyone feel joy and peace for 5 minutes.

The good news is, there’s almost an unlimited number of ways to listen to this song. You can focus on the vocals, or on the harp, or on the strings, or any other sound you like. Each way opens up a new way to experience the song.

I will never forget this so-called technique again. And that proves once again, the best way to do something, anything, is to give it your all. No distraction, no multi-tasking, and no un-awareness. Just one thing at a time.

What a wonderful world this is.

Tags: Music

4 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Andrea // Sep 10, 2008 at 9:17 am

    Oh, weird. I was Googling for “Madam Sachiko” Cambodia and turned up your post about Loreena McKennett, a singer hailing from the next town over from my hometown. Huh.

  • 2 rahmi // Mar 17, 2009 at 7:49 am

    Madam Sachiko is here, it’s the post before Loreena McKennitt. Hope you found it.

  • 3 houses for sale nashville tn // Nov 8, 2011 at 10:32 am

    I wish to express appreciation to the writer for this wonderful post.

  • 4 Russell Mitchell // Jun 25, 2013 at 12:05 pm

    Thereafter, it was offered to Louis Armstrong. George Weiss recounts in the book Off the Record: Songwriters on Songwriting by Graham Nash that he wrote the song specifically for Louis Armstrong. George was inspired by Louis’s ability to bring people of different colors together. The song was not initially a hit in the United States, where it sold fewer than 1,000 copies because the ABC Records head Larry Newton did not like the song and so did not promote it, but was a major success in the United Kingdom, reaching number one on the UK Singles Chart . In the US, the song hit #116 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Chart. It was also the biggest-selling single of 1968 in the UK where it was among the last pop singles issued by HMV Records before becoming an exclusive classical music label.

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